stamp and die storage – updated

Stamp and Die Storage, bashfulcat.comWell, I figured it was high time that I attempt another video, so I thought I’d share a close-up of my recently updated stamp and die storage.  Nothing here is truly revolutionary – Jennifer McGuire already came up with the best ideas, LOL – but I’ve put my own spin on it, and I thought it might interest someone.  Besides, organizational posts and videos are just fun.  🙂

I’ll give you a few close-up details here, but the video will show you the whole process:

I am using a variety of storage pockets/sleeves for my stamps, dies, and stencils (and I’m working on something similar for my embossing folders), but my greatest find, so far, is the Maxtek CD sleeves I found on Amazon: Maxtek 100 Pieces Clear Transparent CPP Plastic CD DVD Sleeves Envelope Holder, 100 micron thickness..  It’s the best deal I’ve found for a really nice, good quality 5″ x 5″ clear plastic sleeve with a fold-in flap.

However, that doesn’t work for the “standard-sized stamp sets, or many of the larger die sets.  For those, I either use the Avery Elle storage pockets that everyone loves, or a much less expensive (and much less impressive) card sleeve from Ultra Pro.  (Links for everything are at the bottom of the post.)  And while it’s not necessary if you use a good quality sleeve, I do really like using magnets to hold my dies in place.Thin die storage, bashfulcat.com

All of my sleeves are numbered – just numbers for stamps, “D” for dies, “ST” for stencils, etc.  For that, I use my beloved Brother P-Touch label maker.  To save a little money, though, I’ve started printing the name and vendor details directly on the cardstock piece that add to the sleeves.  I really like the nice, clean, consistent look that I get from this system.

Instead of sorting my stamps and dies by manufacturer, or by type, I just keep them in numerical order.  When I’m looking for something, I use my index system, instead of flipping through a bunch of sleeves.  I put the images on scraps of cardstock (2-1/2″ x 3-1/2″), and organize them with baseball card sleeves, in 3-ring binders.  With this system, I can actually put a single stamp set in a number of different categories.  On the back of each card, I put the name and manufacturer, and location, so I know just where to find it – easy-peasy, with the numbered sleeves.  This is my favorite part of the system!  And I recently made it even more handy with little, round colored stickers, for differentiating brands at a glance.Stamp index system by KittyStamp Index System, by Kitty

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m doing something very similar with dies and stencils, though due to the size, I can’t use the baseball pockets.  For those, I just use full-size pieces of cardstock.Stamp and Die storage, bashfulcat.com  To store the sleeves, I use a variety of baskets and crates.  The plastic Fridge Bins that Jennifer uses are nice, but I love baskets, and the more casual feel I get from them.  I want my sleeves to all look very similar, but I like that the baskets are not all the same.  It makes my crafty space feel warmer, I think.Craft storage, bashfulcat.com

 

I think that about covers it – the video really shows it best.  If you have any questions, KitEndSig2suggestions, or ideas, just let me know – I love talking storage and organization.  🙂

Thank you so much for stopping by!  Have an awesome day!

Supplies (some affiliate links used – see here for full disclosure. If you make a purchase from these links, it won’t cost you any extra, but I will get a small commission, which will help keep this blog going.  Thank you so much!  SSS=Simon Says Stamp and AMZ=Amazon.com):


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